20 Best Fastpitch Softball Bats 2019: ASA, ISA, ISF, NSA, SSUSA, & USSA Approved Options

Fastpitch softball bats and all bats for that matter have changed dramatically over the last decade. New technology has made it easier to change bat designs and therefore, test different bat designs. Bats are no longer made of only aluminum, and there are now strict regulations on what ages can use what types of bats. With so many bat choices out there, it can be overwhelming to choose the right bat for you or your child. To help you make an educated decision, we have researched and reviewed 20 fastpitch softball bats below and will break down the differences between some of the bats; size, weight, and materials.

Top Fastpitch Softball Bats Comparison Chart

NameMaterialDrop weightPriceWhere to Buy?
2018 Louisville Slugger PXT X18Composite -10$$$Check Price on Amazon
Louisville Slugger XENOComposite-10$$$Check Price on Amazon
Mizuno Titanium Black Onyx Carbon-10$$$$Check Price on Amazon
Rawlings Aspire Composite-12.5$$Check Price on Amazon
DeMarini CFXComposite-10$$$Check Price on Amazon
DeMarini 2019 VendettaComposite-12$$$Check Price on Amazon
Easton Ghost Double BarrelComposite -10$$$$Check Price on Amazon
2019 Anderson RocketechAlloy-12$$Check Price on Amazon
Easton Stealth FlexComposite -10$$Check Price on Amazon
Mizuno Finch JennieAlloy-13$Check Price on Amazon
Mizuno SilhouetteComposite -13$$Check Price on Amazon
DeMarini 2019 Carbon CandyComposite -10$$$Check Price on Amazon
DeMarini CFX SlapperComposite -10$$$Check Price on Amazon
DeMarini BustosAlloy-13$$Check Price on Amazon
Rawlings QuatroComposite -10, -9$$$$Check Price on Amazon
Worth 2 LEGITComposite -10$$$Check Price on Amazon
Mizuno F19 Power CarbonBlack Onyx Carbon-9$$$$Check Price on Amazon
Axe ElementAlloy-21$$$Check Price on Amazon
Easton WonderliteComposite -13$Check Price on Amazon
Easton FS400Alloy -13$Check Price on Amazon

Fastpitch Softball Bats Buyer’s Guide

Choosing the Correct Size Softball Bat

Length

Choosing the correct length bat for you or your child can seem like a daunting task. There are several ways to measure for the right size. Ultimately it comes down to what bat feels the most comfortable when you swing it. As a general rule, you should never increase bat size more than one inch at a time. This allows for a more effortless adjustment to the bat without significantly changing your swing. If you are a beginner or want to re-size yourself out of curiosity, there is a way to do that too. The correct way to do so is to place the knob of the bat(s) you are interested in at the center of your chest extending out toward your fingers. If you can touch the end of the bat with your fingertips, the bat is the correct length for you. Be sure your arm is straight out to your side to obtain an accurate measurement.

You can also use a bat sizing chart which can be found online here or at any sporting goods store. The table allows you to find your weight on the left side of the chart and height on the top of the chart. The number where the column and row intersect should be the correct bat length for you.

Weight

Before exploring different bat weights, it is vital to understand the concept of drop weight or drop. The drop weight of a softball bat is the difference between the length and weight of the bat. If the bat is 28 inches long and has a drop weight of -10, the weight of the bat is 18 ounces. FYI: High School and College leagues regulate drop weights (-3).

There is no real rule or perfect weight when it comes to choosing the correct bat. Generally speaking, neither the heaviest nor the lightest bat is usually the right choice. What is most important is that the bat feels balanced to you when you swing it. Also, if you choose a longer bat, it may be best to go with a lighter weight. On the other hand, if you select a short bat, heavier may be the way to go.

You may think that choosing the correct bat is only a matter of feel. However, the length and weight of the bat makes a difference when it comes down to the physics of the swing. For example, if you have a lightweight, long bat, you will be able to swing it very fast. But fast does not equal power due to physics and inertia which is related to the change in the speed of an object. Of course, the opposite will hold true for a heavy, short bat; there will not be very much bat speed, but the inertia will be high. If all of this is too much math and science for you, some charts can guide you to the correct choice for weight as well

Certifications

Each league uses specific standards and all of the bats below satisfy several league’s conditions. Each league’s rules and requirements can be found on their websites which are below in the References section at the bottom of this article. Be sure to stay current when it comes to these regulations as they sometimes change to make the game safer and more competitive. The leagues you will see below are as follows: ASA (American Softball Association), USSSA (United States Specialty Sports Association), NSA (National Softball Association), ISA (Independent Sports Association), ISF (International Softball Federation), and SSUSA (Senior Softball – USA).

Materials

There are very few leagues, outside of the pros, that require wood bats be used. So, ultimately your materials choice comes down to two types; Alloy and Composite. It is sometimes difficult to understand which metal or composite each manufacturer uses because they often have different names that are made up by each specific company. For example, the DeMarini Vendetta below uses a “lightweight D-Lite handle” for this particular bat. If you are really interested in the composition of your chosen bat(s), a bit of research may be required to find out what precisely a “D-Lite” handle is made of.

Alloy

Alloy bats are also referred to as metal or aluminum bats. These bats have been around much longer than composite bats and are usually cheaper than composite bats. Alloy bats do not require any break-in time which means they are at their full potential right out of the box. However, alloy bats tend to have a smaller sweet spot and less “pop.” The sweet spot is the area of the bat barrel that if hit correctly, will produce the best hit. Pop refers to the sound that the hit from the sweet spot makes. Most players and fans know this sound, and it is highly sought after. Basically, the more expensive the alloy is, the longer the sweet spot is. Alloy bats also last longer than composite bats, and once they are damaged, they usually dent rather than crack and can still be used. Composite bats cannot be used once they are broken.

Composite

Composite bats are made out of layers of material that is similar to carbon fiber. Because of the layering, it is easier to control the weight distribution of the bat and gives the manufacturer the option to end load the bat or keep it balanced. This is one of the reasons composite bats are more expensive than alloy bats. Composite bats also reduce the vibrations created when the ball is hit which reduces the sing in a player’s hands. Composite bats also tend to have more “pop” once they are broken in. However, they do need to be broken-in, so they are not at their prime fresh out of the packaging like an alloy bat. To break in a composite bat, it is necessary to hit around 200 balls with a regular softball, not a rubber cage ball. While completing the break-in process it is also recommended to rotate the bat slightly with each swing, so it is evenly broke-in. Hitting hundreds of balls is the only recommended way to break in a composite bat. Banging the bat against things is not recommended and can damage the bat.

Hybrids

It is possible to have the best of both worlds and go with a hybrid bat. Hybrids have an alloy barrel and a composite handle. Thus, you can have the reduced sting that comes with an alloy bat and the “out-of-the-box” performance from the alloy barrel.

One Piece vs. Two Piece

One-piece bats are generally more balanced but stiffer. Also, one-piece bats are less forgiving on missed hits and allow for more vibrations which leads to potential sting. Two-piece bats typically have more flex and therefore, less vibration. Also, two-piece bats can be end loaded which makes for a heavier swing. To purchase an end loaded bat or not is a matter of preference and your hitting style. Contact hitters usually prefer one-piece bats because of the better balance. Power hitters tend to go with the two-piece bats because of the added flex.

Best Fastpitch Softball Bats Reviews

1. 2018 Louisville Slugger PXT X18 (-10)

The Louisville name is well known throughout softball and baseball and has been for decades. Therefore, it is not surprising to find a Louisville at the top of our list. Louisville Slugger has a 134-year history that all began with one 17-year-old boy, “Bud” who created a bat for then superstar Pete Browning. Browning had broken his bat during the game he played in earlier and Bud offered to make him a new one. Long story short, Browning ended the current slump he was in the next day when he debuted his new bat with three hits. The rest is history and Louisville Slugger, (the company was named after Browning’s nick-name) has been making bats ever since.

This bat has a power balance swing weight which increases bat speed. It has a 100% composite design, a 7/8″ standard handle, and a 2 ¼” barrel. With a -10 drop, this bat comes in 30″/20 oz to 34″/24 oz. The PXT has a lightweight “X-Cap” which improves swing speed and uses patented TRU3 construction which provides a great pop on contact and reduces vibration. The weight balance of this bat is end loaded. This bat is USSSA, ASA, NSA, ISA, and ISF approved as well.

Pros

  • Tops most other best of lists

Cons

  • Not available in smaller sizes
  • Pricey

2. Louisville Slugger XENO (-10)

The Louisville Slugger 2019 XENO could be the number one bat on this list. The position of the PXT and the XENO are a matter of preference, and we consider this a tie, though you may rank them how you see fit. Either way, the XENO is a bat that is stiffer than most other comparable bats and users seem to enjoy this feeling. The bat boasts a one-of-a-kind pop due to the double-layered barrel, which is the standard 2 ¼”. While hitters may feel the stiffness in the hands a bit (sting), the exit velocity seems to outweigh the pain. The bat comes in 5 different length/weight sizes. A -10 drop remains consistent throughout the different options of 30″/20 oz, to 34″/24 oz. The weight balance of this bat is balanced. This bat is USSSA, ASA, NSA, ISA, and ISF approved as well.

Pros

  • Multiple length/weight options
  • Another Louisville bat at the top

Cons

  • Not available in smaller sizes

3. Mizuno Titanium (-10)

The Mizuno Corporation was founded in 1906 by two brothers, Rihachi and Rizo Mizuno. They started as a small company that western sundries, including baseballs. Over the years the Mizunos expanded their inventory to include all types of sports equipment including golf clubs, baseball gloves, and skis. Eventually, they started making wooden baseball bats, but since then they have realized and kept up with the evolution of technology and now also make fastpitch softball bats.

The Mizuno Titanium has a unique half and half barrel design that mixes titanium and “Black Onyx Carbon.” The handle is more carbon than titanium which creates a stiffer feel and generates outstanding energy transfer. There are little vibrations upon contact because the handle redirects energy back into the barrel and gives the bat maximum pop. The barrel is the standard 2 ¼”. The bat comes in 6 different length/weight sizes. The bat comes in a -10 drop and sizes 33”/23 oz or 34”/24 oz. This bat is USSSA, ASA, NSA, ISA, and ISF approved as well.

Pros

  • Power
  • Maximum pop

Cons

  • Expensive

4. Rawlings Aspire (-12.5)

Rawlings Sporting Goods Co., Inc. was founded in 1887 by George and Alfred Rawlings and specialized in baseball equipment, but also manufactures softball and other sporting equipment. They produced wooden bats until around 1998 Rawlings when they began experimenting with aluminum bats. Today Rawlings is one of the top producers of baseball and softball equipment for the MLB, Minor League, NCAA, and National High School Federation.

Every other bat on this list has an even number drop weight. Not the Rawlings Aspire! This bat has a unique -12.5 drop that makes this a fantastic bat for younger players. This bat is a one-piece composite, and the weight is balanced. Rawlings says that the bat has “360-degrees of durable hitting surface” because the barrel sleeve has no seams or weak points. The barrel is the standard 2 ¼”. The bat comes in 5 different length/weight sizes: 28”/15.5 oz to 32”/19.5 oz. This bat is USSSA, ASA, NSA, ISA, and ISF approved as well.

Pros

  • Unique drop weight
  • Durable barrel with no weak spots

Cons

  • Expensive
  • The synthetic grip is not a favorite of players

5. DeMarini CFX (-10)

The DeMarini CFX was designed with the experienced player in mind. The bat is a two-piece end loaded bat, and the barrel is composite and provides excellent flex. DeMarini claims that this bat is 22% stronger than the previous model. The barrel is the standard 2 ¼”. The bat comes in 6 different length/weight sizes. A -10 drop remains consistent throughout the different options of 30″/20 oz, to 34″/24 oz. This bat is USSSA, ASA, NSA, ISA, and ISF approved as well.

Pros

  • Great absorption
  • Experienced players will notice the improvement in their swing

Cons

  • Pricey

6. DeMarini 2019 Vendetta (-12)

The DeMarini 2019 Vendetta is a two-piece composite design with a Paradox Composite barrel. The lightweight “D-Lite” handle design gives balance and an overall great feel. The bat has a large hitting area and a “Big D” end cap that helps absorb vibrations for a smooth swing. The Vendetta has a 2 ¼” barrel and comes in 5 different length/weight sizes. A -12 drop remains consistent throughout the different options of 29″/17 oz, 30″/18 oz, 31″/19 oz, 32″/20 oz, 33″/21 oz. The weight balance of this bat is balanced. This bat is USSSA, ASA, NSA, ISA, and ISF approved as well.

Pros

  • Multiple length/weight options

Cons

  • Pricey

7. Easton Ghost Double Barrel (-10)

Easton was originally a company that manufactured bows and arrows; however, they entered the world of baseball and softball bats in 1969. Over the years Easton has had several ground-breaking moments including being one of the first adopters of aluminum for bat material. Easton did not invent the aluminum bat, but they made it faster, lighter and more durable than their competitors. Easton was the first company to introduce the two-piece bat technology to softball in the early 90s. Easton also created titanium bats which, at the time, were lighter and hotter than the best aluminum and composite bats. Easton has remained an innovator and a favorite softball bat manufacturer since its days of origin.

The Easton Ghost Double Barrel is an excellent bat for High School and College players. The bat is a two-piece, fully composite bat. The 2 ¼” barrel is a double barrel design which many players like because of the feel, sound, and pop. This bat will be hot out of the box and requires no break-in period. With a -10 drop weight this bat length/weight ranges from 30″/20 oz to 34″/24 oz. The weight balance of this bat is balanced. This bat is ASA and ISA, and NCAA approved as well.

Pros

  • Large sweet spot

Cons

  • Not approved for USSSA or NSA
  • May be too stiff for a beginner

8. 2019 Anderson Rocketech (-12)

Anderson Bat Company was founded in 1999 and has been a part of fastpitch softball since then. They entered the market with a commitment to the ever-evolving updates in bat technology and desire to improve players by improving their products. Over the last decade, they have proven that theirs is a labor of love and are one of the industry’s leading manufacturers of aluminum softball bats.

The Anderson Rocketech has a 2 ¼” barrel that is constructed from “Aerospace Alloy.” The bat boasts power arch technology and a single wall design which makes it one of the most durable bats on the market. Anderson says the bat will never crack or dent. The bat also has a softer grip which reduces vibration. With a -12 drop weight this bat length/weight ranges from 29″/17 oz to 30″/18 oz. This bat is ideal for players ages 7-10 years old. The weight balance of this bat is balanced. This bat is USSSA, ASA, NSA, and ISA approved as well.

Pros

  • Power
  • Reasonably priced

Cons

  • Small age range of use

9. Easton Stealth Flex (-10)

Much like some of the others on this list, Easton is a well know brand for bats as well. The Stealth Flex 10 has a -10 drop weight and comes in 31″/21 oz, 33″/23 oz, and 34″/24 oz sizes. The bat is a two-piece “TCT Thermo Composite Technology” and “CXN ZERO technology” which reduces vibration and eliminates sting. The bat boasts a more prominent “sweet spot” thank any other Easton fastpitch bats before. The handle is skinny which provides stability for the hitter, and the weight balance of this bat is balanced. This bat is USSSA, ASA, NSA, SSUSA, ISF, and ISA approved as well.

Pros

  • Great uses of new technology

Cons

  • Not available in smaller sizes

10. Mizuno Finch Jennie (-13)

This bat is the result of the collaboration between the Mizuno bat company and Team USA softball legend Jennie Finch. This bat is all aluminum and one piece which provides durability. The bat comes wrapped with a synthetic bat grip that reduces the sting. This bat has a lightweight drop of -13 and a standard 2 ¼” barrel diameter. The Mizuno Finch comes in a bunch of different sizes ranging from 27″/14 oz to 33″/20 oz, so it is accessible to players of all ages. The weight balance of this bat is balanced. This bat is approved for play by ASA, USSSA, NSA, ISA, and ISF.

Pros

  • Multiple length/weight options
  • Budget-friendly

Cons

  • None

11. Mizuno Silhouette (-13)

The Mizuno Silhouette is recommended for youth players. This bat is all composite and one piece which provides durability. The “Black Onyx” carbon handle provides a stiff feel, and the “X-Zone” barrel creates a massive sweet spot. This bat has a lightweight drop of -13 and a standard 2 ¼” diameter double barrel. The Mizuno Silhouette comes in a variety of different sizes ranging from 27″/14 oz to 33″/20 oz, so it is accessible to players of all ages. The weight balance of this bat is balanced. This bat is approved for play by ASA, USSSA, NSA, and ISA.

Pros

  • Reasonably priced

Cons

  • Recommended for youth players makes range of use seem limited

12. DeMarini 2019 Carbon Candy (-10)

The DeMarini Carbon Candy is one of several DeMarini bats on our list for a good reason. Company founder Ray DeMarini set out to make a heavy hitting fastpitch bat in 1986, and this goal turned into his life’s work. DeMarini wanted a “technical bat for the sophisticated ballplayer.” This bat is lightweight and has excellent balance and is ideal for high school level players. Much like the Vendetta mentioned above this bat has a “D Lite” handle that creates a smooth swing while decreasing vibrations and sting. This bat uses the “DFusion 2.0″ connection system to bring the handle and barrel together. The weight balance of this bat is balanced, and the barrel is the standard 2 ¼”. Sizes range from 30”/20 oz to 34”/24 oz. This bat is approved for play by ASA, USSSA, NSA, ISA, and ISF.

Pros

  • DeMarini bats are always on best-of lists

Cons

  • Ideal for high-school players makes range of use seem limited

13. DeMarini CFX Slapper (-10)

The DeMarini CFX Slapper is designed for left-handed hitters. The barrel is 14” long which is longer than most. The weight balance of this bat is technically balanced, but it feels like the bat is weighted more toward the hands which ultimately provides better barrel control. The barrel is the standard 2 ¼” and is made of composite. The handle is composite, but this bat does have a more significant vibration than most on the list. Sizes range from 31”/21 oz to 34”/24 oz. This bat is approved for play by ASA, USSSA, NSA, ISA, and ISF.

Pros

  • Great pop

Cons

  • Vibration

14. DeMarini Bustos (-13)

Another DeMarini bat on the list! Two-time Olympic gold medalist as part of Team USA, Crystl Bustos partnered with DeMarini to create this bat which is designed to set young players up for success in the batter’s box. This bat has a composite handle and an aluminum alloy barrel that is 2 ¼”. The composite handle helps reduce vibrations and sting. The weight balance of this bat is balanced, and it has a -13 drop. The sizes of the bat range from 29″/16 oz to 32″/19 oz. This bat is approved for play by ASA, USSSA, NSA, ISA, and ISF.

Pros

  • Lightweight
  • No sting

Cons

  • Longer break-in time

15. Rawlings Quatro (-10, -9)

This bat is recommended for high school and collegiate players. The barrel is made of composite, and the barrel-handle connection is designed to reduce vibration and increase speed using Rawlings’ VDT (Vibration Dampening Technology). There is a silicone infused collar at the handle to aid in producing a smooth feel. The barrel is the standard 2 ¼” and comes in sizes from 30″/20 oz to 34″/24 oz in a -10 drop. There are also two -9 drop options with sizes 33″/24 oz and 34″/25 oz. The weight balance of this bat is balanced. This bat is also certified by the ASA, USSSA, NSA, ISA, and ISF.

Pros

  • Two different drop options (-10 and -9)

Cons

  • Expensive

16. Worth 2 LEGIT (-10)

Worth, Inc. saw its beginning way back in 1912 when George Sharp Lannim, Jr. purchased a tannery in Tennessee. The business initially tanned leather for harnesses and horse collars. When the auto industry took off Lannim had to refocus his production and began making baseballs and softballs. In 1959 they began manufacturing baseball bats, and in 1968 they shifted to making aluminum and other composite bats for both baseball and softball. Worth continues to make softball bats to this day and is now a division of Rawlings.

The Worth 2 Legit bat is made of composite, and it has a double wall barrel which increases rebound. This bat is a four-piece design, which is not entirely conventional but provides the hitter with greater flex on contact. Worth also says this bat eliminates sting altogether. This bat comes in sizes from 31”/21 oz to 34”/24 oz. The barrel is the standard 2 ¼”. The weight balance of this bat is balanced. This bat is also certified by the ASA, USSSA, NSA, ISA, and ISF.

Pros

  • Versatile

Cons

  • None

17. Mizuno F19 Power Carbon (-9)

The Mizuno F19 is a two-piece bat that features a patent-pending “Dual Frequency Dampener” joined with a “Black Onyx Carbon” barrel and handle. The new technology creates a more significant pop, which Mizuno says is more like a boom than a pop. This bat also boasts a new “Detonator Cor” which claims to reduce barrel compression which gives players a game-ready bat that feels natural right out of the box. This bat has a -9 drop weight so at 34′ the bat is 25 oz. The weight balance of this bat is balanced. This bat is USSSA, ASA, NSA, ISF, and ISA approved as well.

Pros

  • Less break-in time

Cons

  • Expensive

18. Axe Element (-21)

The concept for the Axe handle was created while a coach named Bruce Leinert was passing the time by day-dreaming about hitting baseballs while cutting down trees on his land. Rather than a knob at the end of the handle, the Axe handle is shaped like the handle of an ax, hence the name, and is supposed to provide a more comfortable swing while allowing for better control and the ability to square up even inside pitches. The Axe Element is a one-piece alloy bat that features a patented Axe handle that is said to enable your best swing. Players support these claims with reviews that agree with these statements and even state the handle can reduce injury at the plate. The bat boasts maximum bat speed and improved barrel control. The 2 ¼” barrel is made of “Premium Mantic Alloy” which is the most durable material Axe has ever used which delivers the extra durability and explosive pop. This bat has a -12 drop weight and comes in sizes ranging from 29”/17 oz to 34”/22 oz. The weight balance of this bat is balanced. This bat is USSSA, ASA, NSA, NCAA, NFHS ISF, and ISA approved as well.

Pros

  • End cap removes unnecessary weight for increased bat speeds

Cons

  • None

19. Easton Wonderlite (-13)

The Easton Wonderlite is an excellent bat for young, beginning players. It does not have all of the newest technology or performance-enhancing features like many of the other bats on this list, but that is part of the reason it is here. The bat is simplistic and offers a single drop weight of -13. The “Hyperlite” composite barrel claims to maximize the sweet spot, and the handle is ultra-thin with a “Hyperskin” grip. Being a 100% composite bat combined with its light weight makes this a great bat for the smallest of players. The Wonderlite comes in a variety of sizes ranging from 28”/15 oz to 33”/20 oz. The weight balance of this bat is balanced. This bat is USSSA, ASA, NSA, SSUSA, ISF, and ISA approved as well.

Pros

  • Low-priced option
  • Great for beginners and younger players

Cons

  • Not many features
  • Not recommended for older, larger players

20. Easton FS400 (-13)

The Easton FS500 made this list because it is a budget-friendly bat that performs well. It is a one-piece alloy bat that is speed and power. This bat also has a super thin handle with “All Sports” grip and the standard 2 ¼” barrel. The Easton FS500 is an excellent bat for beginners. With a -13 drop weight this bat is lightweight and therefore works well for younger players. The FS500 comes in a variety of sizes ranging from 29”/16 oz to 33”/20 oz. The weight balance of this bat is balanced. This bat is USSSA, ASA, NSA, SSUSA, ISF, and ISA approved as well.

Pros

  • Low-priced option
  • Great for beginners

Cons

  • May not last as long as others

Conclusion And Final Fastpitch Softball Bats Recommendations

After reviewing all of the above fastpitch softball bats, it has become clear that choosing the correct bat for you or your child is not an easy task. The question of what makes a perfect fastpitch softball bat has a simple answer, but the explanation is complicated. There are several things to consider, and after all of the research and trial swings and measurements the decision ultimately comes down to feel. It is all based on you or your kids experience, personal preferences, style of play, and athleticism. Also, as you or your young player grow either literally or in the sense of improving hitting, you will likely need to purchase new bats to accommodate the changes. The main thing to consider when purchasing a new bat is to buy based on your needs, not the bat’s properties. It is tempting to buy the most popular bat out there that has the coolest features, but that bat will not get you the results you desire.

As stated above, bat length and weight should be determined by your weight and length. Basic measuring techniques can be used to get you in the ballpark of specs that will work for you. There are also charts that use your height and weight to determine the correct bat size for you. Once you find the overall length and weight of the bat you need composition materials, certifications, drop weights, balances, and one or two pieces are your next decisions. Certifications are not really negotiable if you are playing any league softball. There are many resources on the web that can help you figure out what regulations your league requires. All of the bats on the list above are certified for most leagues that you or your kid will play in. Be sure to check though because regulations change all of the time to ensure player safety and improve the game.

Composition materials and how many pieces the bat is are decisions you will make based on feel and what type of hitter you are. Most of the best bats are either made of aluminum alloy or composite, and as described above, several are a combination of the two. Two-part bats usually provide a better trampoline effect and better maneuverability. An all-composite bat is generally used because of their increased quality and durability. Composite bats are usually more expensive and can be sensitive to weather conditions. Composite handles produce less vibrations and therefore, less sting in the hands on a miss-hit. Aluminum bats are typically lighter but provided more power and are traditionally cheaper than composite bats as well.

Our suggestion is to swing as many bats as you can before deciding on what bat you are going to purchase. Many bats are expensive, so making the correct and informed decision is important. You are making a small investment. Another tip is to purchase bats that have 30 day guarantees. These companies allow you to use the bat, even in games, for up to 30 days and you can return them if you are not satisfied. Some companies will allow you to trade the bat in for a different size or model while some companies will refund your money. Ultimately the choice is yours (or your child’s). The bat that is the correct size for you and feels best in your hands is the right bat for you. We hope that all of the above information helps you to make an informed decision. Whether you are a beginner looking to find a bat to get started with or an expert hitter seeking more power or speed, there is a bat on the above list for you. So, get out there and get swinging!

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